Penny Wong Is Sick Of Marriage Equality Opponents Telling Her Children They Aren't Normal

02/02/2016 9:15 PM AEDT | Updated 15/07/2016 12:51 PM AEST
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Labor frontbencher Penny Wong is sick of her children being told they are “somehow lesser” or “not normal” for growing up with same-sex parents.

Speaking on Fran Kelly’s show on Tuesday, Ms Wong said it was not only hurtful bringing children into the same-sex marriage debate, but pointless.

“The reality is we already know that we have children growing up in same sex families. They are a reality, my children are a reality, and whether or not the prejudicial marriage laws are retained won’t change that,” Wong said on the program.

“Yet opponents use children in very hurtful ways to argue against this change, and I think it really needs to be confronted and I certainly intend -- I’m sure as many others do -- to stand up for my kids.

"I don’t believe they should be told over and over again by opponents that somehow they’re somehow lesser or not normal.”

Wong, who has two daughters with her partner Sophie Allouache, penned an essay published in The Monthly on Monday arguing 'it's time' for the nation to legalise same-sex marriage.

"The 'think of the children' argument is among the most hurtful in the marriage equality debate," Senator Wong wrote in the essay.

"It posits that gay and lesbian relationships harm children, that gay and lesbian parents are bad parents."

On Tuesday, the Australian Christian Lobby said all children deserve a mother and a father, which same-sex marriage cannot provide.

ACL Managing Director Lyle Shelton argued marriage equality would force change in current legislation around surrogacy and sperm donation.

“It is not possible to provide the benefits of so-called marriage equality without lifting Australia’s prohibition on commercial surrogacy and again allowing anonymous sperm donation," said Shelton in a media release from the lobby group.

Same-sex couples do face some discrimination when going through the lengthy adoption process in Australia as well as prejudice in surrogacy clinics overseas, depending on the country.

In October, new legislation in Victoria legalised adoption for same-sex couples in the state.

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