Terrifying Sea Creatures That Will Make You Fear The Ocean

03/04/2016 4:48 PM AEST | Updated 15/07/2016 12:51 PM AEST
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London, UNITED KINGDOM: A visitor to the Science Museum in London, studies a Fangtooth fish, 13 October, at the new exhibition ' The Science of Aliens' which runs from the 15 October until 26 February 2006. AFP PHOTO /MARTYN HAYHOW (Photo credit should read MARTYN HAYHOW/AFP/Getty Images)

Some things are just better kept far, far away from the rest of civilisation. For instance, at the bottom of the sea.

When it comes to freaky creatures, the ocean has more than its fair share. And we're not talking about the predators everyone is already scared of, like the Great White shark. We're talking about the weird, funky, and frankly terrifying creatures which dwell in the depths of the sea, otherwise known as the stuff of your future nightmares.

You know, like these guys.

1. Frilled shark

frilled shark

The freaky-looking frilled shark dates back 80 million years (!) so it makes sense, when they are sighted (very rarely, but most recently in Australia) that they are often referred to as a 'living fossil'.

These deep water eel-like sharks can reach lengths of up to two metres long and look so weird, it's widely theorised they may have something to do with the "sea monsters" referred to in ancient myths and legends.

Want to see more? Check out the video below.


2. Goblin shark

goblin shark

You know how we said the frilled shark was often referred to as a living fossil? Same with this scary looking creature, who actually blitzes old Frilly out of the water when it comes to being an ancient species. The goblin shark species is thought to date back 125 million years.

Goblin sharks tend to hang out at the depths of 1200 metres which is why they aren't seen very often (but, again, one was recently found off the Australian coast. Joy.)

Want to know how it eats its prey? According to the Australian Museum's fish collection manager Mark McGrouther, "it will spear it with those sharp pointed teeth and then just wolf it down whole." Oh good.

Those wanting to learn more, feast your eyes on this:


3. Fangtooth fish

fangtooth

No prizes for guessing where this fish got its name. The fangtooth fish, while not that big (they grow up to 15cm long) is still pretty terrifying to look at.

Little though they may be, their massive fangs are designed for catching and hanging onto prey of just about any size. In fact, its fangs are proportionately the largest of any fish in the ocean.

Luckily, they are deep sea dwellers so you're unlikely to come across them any time soon, and even if you did, they aren't thought to be dangerous to humans.

Seriously though. Check this out.


4. Stargazer fish

stargazer fish

This fish has its eyes on top of its head, hence the name, and makes very good use of them when it hides in the sand waiting to spring out AT ANY MOMENT to devour some innocent fish that happens to be swimming by.

That's right. Not only does the stargazer have a pretty scary face to begin with, it also likes to add an element of surprise to the mix by burrowing itself in the sand only to leap out and attack.

Given these fish dwell in temperate waters, they are often spotted by divers and given they also have the ability to produce electrical currents, are best left alone.

Or you could film one devouring a fish whole like the video below... it's up to you.


5. Viperfish

viperfish

Another aptly named fish, the viperfish also lives deep, deep in the sea and looks like it swam straight out of a horror movie.

Case in point: the viperfish has a hinged skull and large stomach, which allows it to swallow and stockpile unusually large meals. *Shudder*

Even worse, because they live so deep and don't survive well in captivity, not much is known about them.

We'll let your imagination do the rest.



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