This Behavior Is The #1 Predictor Of Divorce, And You're Guilty Of It

Your body language speaks volumes.

10/05/2016 9:30 AM AEST | Updated 10/05/2016 9:30 AM AEST
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Ever catch yourself rolling your eyes at your partner or getting a little too sarcastic during a conversation? Those seemingly small behaviors are not that innocent after all. 

According to renowned researcher John Gottman, contemptuous behavior like eye-rolling, sarcasm and name-calling is the number one predictor of divorce.

For 40 years, the University of Washington psychology professor and his team at the Gottman Institute have studied couples' interactions to determine the key predictors of divorce -- or as Gottman calls them, “the four horsemen of the apocalypse." 

Contempt is the number one sign, followed by criticism, defensiveness and stonewalling (emotionally withdrawing from your partner.)

So how do you curb contempt in your own marriage and stave off divorce? Below, experts share seven things you can do to keep contempt in check.

1. Realize that delivery is everything. 

"Remember, it’s not what you say, but how you say it that makes all the difference. Contempt often comes in the form of name-calling, snickering, sarcasm, eye-rolling and long heavy sighs. Like a poison, it can erode the trust and safety in your relationship and bring your marriage to a slow death. Your goal is to be heard. You need to present your message in a way that makes this happen without doing damage to the relationship." -- Christine Wilke, a marriage therapist based in Easton, Pennsylvania

2. Ban the word "whatever" from your vocabulary. 

"When you say 'whatever' to your partner, you’re basically saying you’re not going to listen to them. This sends them a message that whatever they’re talking about is unimportant and has no merit to you. This is the last thing you want your spouse to hear. Sending messages (even indirectly through contempt) that they’re not important will end a relationship pretty quickly." -- Aaron Anderson, a Denver, Colorado-based marriage and family therapist

3. Stay clear of sarcasm and mean-spirited jokes. 

"Avoid sarcasm and comments like, 'I’ll bet you do!' or 'Oh, that was super funny” in a rude tone of voice. While you're at it, don’t make jokes at the expense of your partner or make universal comments about his or her gender ('You would say that -- you're a guy')." -- LeMel Firestone-Palerm, a marriage and family therapist 

4. Don’t live in the past. 

"Most couples start showing contempt because they have let a lot of little things build up. To avoid contempt all together, you need to stay current in your communications along the way. If you’re unhappy about something, say it directly. Also, acknowledge the valid complaints your partner has about you -- you’ll probably be less self-righteous the next time you fight." -- Judith and Bob Wright, authors of The Heart of the Fight: A Couple's Guide to Fifteen Common Fights, What They Really Mean, and How They Can Bring You Closer

5. Watch your body language. 

"If you find yourself rolling your eyes or smirking, it is a signal that your relationship could be headed for trouble. Try taking a break from each other if things get heated, or try focusing on positive aspects that you like about your partner." -- Chelli Pumphrey, a counselor based in Denver, Colorado

6. Don't ever tell your spouse, "you're overreacting." 

"When you say your S.O. is overreacting, what you're really saying is that their feelings are unimportant to you. Instead of telling your partner that they’re overreacting, listen to their point of view. Try to understand where they’re coming from and why they feel that way. They have those feelings for a reason." -- Aaron Anderson 

7. If you find yourself being contemptuous, stop and take a deep breath.

"Make it your goal to become aware of what contempt is. Then find out specifically what it looks like in your marriage. When you feel the urge to go there, take a deep breath, and say 'stop' quietly to yourself. Find another way to make your point. Contempt is a bad habit like smoking or nail biting. With work, you can break it." -- Bonnie Ray Kennan, a psychotherapist based in Torrance, California

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