WORLD
13/05/2016 12:01 AM AEST

ISIS Suicide Blasts Claim More Iraqi Lives After Deadliest Day In Baghdad This Year

At least 80 people died in ISIS bombings in the Iraqi capital on Wednesday.

Alaa Al-Marjani / Reuters
Islamic State suicide bombers killed two policeman in Abu Ghraib on Thursday, a day after a triple bombing took over 80 lives.
Alaa Al-Marjani / Reuters
Islamic State suicide bombers killed two policeman in Abu Ghraib on Thursday, a day after a triple bombing took over 80 lives.

BAGHDAD (Reuters) - Two suicide bombings claimed by Islamic State in a town near Baghdad killed two policemen and wounded eight others on Thursday, police and medics said, a day after Islamic State bombs left at least 80 people dead in the Iraqi capital.

The death toll made Wednesday's three suicide bombings at a busy market and two checkpoints the bloodiest day in Baghdad so far this year.

Police sources said Thursday's bombers had approached a police station in Abu Ghraib from two directions before detonating their explosives.

Baghdad Operations Command, one of the security apparatuses charged with protecting the capital, said in a statement that a third assailant was killed on approach of the police station.

Amaq news agency, which supports Islamic State, said two militants had clashed with police at al-Zeidan station before detonating their explosives-filled vests.

Wissm Al-Okili / Reuters
Thursday's attacks came one day after ISIS bombs killed at least 80 people in Baghdad.

Baghdad became the target of daily bombings a decade ago following the U.S.-led invasion in 2003 that toppled Saddam Hussein. Violence against security forces and Shi'ite Muslim civilians is frequent, even as U.S.-backed Iraqi forces have rolled Islamic State back from swathes of the country's west and north seized in 2014.

A recent surge in bombings has added to criticism of Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi, who already faces a political crisis over his attempts to overhaul his cabinet as part of an anti-corruption bid.

Lawmakers have failed to convene a session since protesters loyal to a powerful Shi'ite cleric Moqtada al-Sadr, a vocal advocate of dismantling Iraq's quota-based governing system, breached the heavily-fortified Green Zone district two weeks ago and took over the parliament complex for several hours.

(Reporting by Kareem Raheem and Omar Fahmy in Cairo; Writing by Stephen Kalin; Editing by Raissa Kasolowsky)

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