POLITICS

Greens Commit Funding For Royal Commission Into Disability Abuse

The $400 million plan will seek a Royal Commission over four years.

23/06/2016 6:32 AM AEST | Updated 15/07/2016 12:54 PM AEST
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The Australian Greens have committed to a four-year plan for a Royal Commission into abuse of people with a disability.

The Greens will push for $400m to fund a Royal Commission into the abuse and neglect of people with a disability in institutional and residential settings such as group homes, after an inquiry was told of widespread abuse.

A senate inquiry led by Greens Senator Rachel Siewert in November heard of the high levels of violence and abuse shown towards people with a disability.

The outcome of the inquiry was a list of 30 recommendations for greater regulations for disability workers including mandatory reporting rules, a national complaints watchdog and a Royal Commission, the ABC reported.

"Right now, across the country, many people with disability are experiencing abuse, violence and neglect whilst in institutional and residential settings," Siewert told the Huffington Post Australia.

"It is time to act on the recommendations of the Senate inquiry to fix the system, we need a Royal Commission into abuse, violence and neglect of people with disability in institutional and residential settings."

According to ABC's 7.30 on Wednesday, a report of violence in group homes showed 437 incidents in the nine months prior to August 2015, of which 38 percent involved physical abuse, 20 percent due to neglect and 17 percent due to sexual abuse or misconduct.

"This is ongoing and it's happening. It will be happening every day," Siewert told ABC 7.30.

"Every day since we handed down our Senate report there will have been abuse or violence or neglect of a person with a disability around this country. Because it's ongoing."

The Greens will take their commitment to the polls on July 2 amid tough opposition from the two major parties following a preference deal that could see the party's election chances affected.

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