HEALTHY LIVING

This Video Powerfully Shows Why Men Need To Talk About Mental Health

Wow.

07/09/2016 6:25 AM AEST | Updated September 7, 2016 06:25

Men who are struggling with a mental health challenge are more prone to stay silent and not seek treatment than female counterparts. That’s why Movember, an organization dedicated to men’s health, is actively working to have an ongoing conversation about psychological wellbeing. 

“Talking about the big stuff in life ― health, relationships, tough times ― isn’t easy for anyone, but traditional concepts of masculinity place an extra burden on men,” Mark Hedstrom, senior vice president of global operations for Movember, told The Huffington Post. “Too many are ‘toughing it out,’ keeping their feelings to themselves and struggling alone with their issues.”

Too many are ‘toughing it out,’ keeping their feelings to themselves and struggling alone with their issues.

In honor of World Suicide Prevention Day on September 10, Movember created a video that highlights mental health issues in the most powerful way: By sharing last letters from men who almost died by suicide. The PSA is a touching reminder that things can and will get better ― and it’s okay to ask for help.

A 2015 study found that men are specifically less likely to speak up if they’re having suicidal thoughts. That’s why campaigns like Movember’s are so important: They publicly remind those at risk that they’re not alone and it’s crucial to admit you need support.

“The goal of this video is to ignite important conversations about suicide, the complex issues that surround it and what everyone can do to address it,” Hedstrom said. “Conversations that we hope will save lives and prevent the far-reaching and painful consequences for the families, friends and communities of the men tragically lost every day. It’s an uncomfortable conversation, but it’s one that needs to be had.”

Take a look at the Movember video above. It’s proof that when it comes to mental health, just simply talking about it can save a life.

If you or someone you know needs help, call 1-800-273-8255 for the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline. Outside of the U.S., please visit the International Association for Suicide Prevention for a database of resources.

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