LIFE

Six Things Extremely Healthy People Do Every Day

Getting in shape shouldn't just be for an occasion -- it's for life.

11/09/2016 5:05 PM AEST | Updated September 12, 2016 05:06
John Fedele
Corny but true: change comes from self-love.

Contrary to what pictures of gym selfies and acai bowls will have you think, when it comes to being healthy it's about much more than what's presented on social media.

For the super fit, going to the gym isn't seen as some big event. It's simply a regular part of their routine, one they don't even have to think about because it's automatic.

To them, eating right and exercising isn't done to fit into those jeans -- it's a habit they've chosen to commit to -- which puts their health above everything.

And really, who could argue with that?

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1. They make exercise a priority

"When you give exercise as much significance as say a morning meeting, it becomes an automatic, non-negotiable part of your day," Kevin Toonen, founder and personal trainer at Strength Elite told The Huffington Post Australia.

Sure, we all get off track from time to time but Toonen explains when you have this sort of mindset, getting back into exercise isn't seen as such a chore.

"People who put their health first understand you don't need to be fit to go to the gym -- you go to the gym to get fit -- and we all have to start somewhere," Toonen said.

Caiaimage/Paul Bradbury
'Remember, you don't need to be fit to go to the gym -- you go to the gym to get fit.'

2. "Snoozing" isn't in their vocabulary

Shea Morrison, sleep expert and co-founder of The Goodnight Co explains when we hit 'snooze' we're setting ourselves up to fail.

"Having that setback so early on in the day means we're never going to achieve what we set out to do," Morrison told HuffPost Australia.

"If you're finding you are waking up groggy it probably means you need to look at other areas of your life. For example, an earlier bedtime, avoiding caffeine after 2pm and ensuring you're not having a heavy meal right before bed," Morrison said.

3. They see food as a nourishing source

Reaching for junk food when we're stressed is something we've all been guilty of.

"These 'rewards' tend to be in the form of high sugar, high trans-fat foods though, all this does is cause a spike and throw out our blood sugar levels," Rebecca Gawthorne, accredited practising dietitian told HuffPost Australia.

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They see food as fuel.

Those who put their health first will always recognise the craving and try and satisfy it with something that provides nutrients, rather than processed sugars and fats.

Think: some fresh fruit or a wholegrain cracker with some peanut butter or hommus.

4. They never skip meals

For the super healthy, food is seen as fuel and therefore they never skip a meal, especially breakfast.

"Ensuring you have three meals a day and some healthy snacks in between will stabilise your blood sugar levels and reduce junk food cravings," Gawthorne said.

If it's not in sight, you are less likely to eat it -- and probably more likely to focus on preparing meals that are nutrient-rich -- rather than thinking about your next sugar hit.

Removing all junk food from your home and workplace is something Gawthorne strongly recommends.

"If it's not in sight, you are less likely to eat it -- and probably more likely to focus on preparing meals that are nutrient-rich -- rather than thinking about your next sugar hit."

5. They practice moderation

This is especially the case for alcohol. They understand the effect excessive drinking has on their energy levels and this means that for them, abstaining from alcohol for a month or so isn't a big deal, because they're aware of the health benefits it brings.

"One of the most common things people report after abstaining from alcohol is that they are sleeping better," professor Wayne Hall, director and Inaugural Chair Centre for Youth Substance Abuse told HuffPost Australia.

This obviously has a flow-on effect for concentration, productivity and mood throughout the day.

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People who put their health first value a good night's kip.

6. They value sleep (and probably meditate)

They don't place meditation in the "too-hard basket" (and do so even if they've only got a spare five minutes). They also aim for at least six to eight hours' sleep each night. As with exercise, they sleep and meditate to feel better and whatever physical gains that come from that, well that's just a bonus!

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