Laksa Food Poisoning Strikes 14 In Northern Territory

The NT Department of Health says more people might be affected

19/10/2016 11:24 AM AEDT | Updated 19/10/2016 6:29 PM AEDT
Singapore Laksa at Singapore zoo

Northern Territorians looking for a spicy meal this week received a different kind of kick, with 14 people struck down by food poisoning traced to a laksa vendor.

The NT Department of Health on Wednesday issued a warning about eating laksa purchased at two recent Mindil Beach Markets following a cluster of food-poisoning in the Darwin area.

The source of the outbreak has been identified and the stall shut down for rest of the market season.

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Laksa is extremely popular in the Northern Territory, where the Asian cuisine has been made with crocodile and prawns.

"We are warning the public not to consume any laksa which was purchased at Mindil Beach markets last Thursday or Sunday evenings," Acting head of the Centre for Disease Control, Dr Peter Markey, said in a statement.

"Any laksa which was purchased from Mindil Beach on those nights and is still in your fridge or freezer should be disposed of immediately."

The Huffington Post Australia understands no-one is currently in hospital, however one person did spend a short time in the emergency department before being sent home.

Food-poisoning symptoms come on within a few hours after eating the food and usually last 12 hours or less, the NT Department of Health said.

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Diners at Mindil Beach Markets were struck down with food poisoning after eating laksa

People working in the food-handling business who might suffer food-poisoning are advised to stay home from work for at least 24-48 hours.

While 14 cases have been identified, Dr Markey said it was possible more people had been affected, with investigations continuing into the cluster of food-poisoning.

It's not the first time the Northern Territory has become a hot zone for food poisoning. In April, 12 people were hospitalised by a salmonella outbreak traced back to the popular Laksa topping -- mung beans.

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