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Gable Tostee Opens Up On Warriena Wright's Death On 60 Minutes

The Nine Network will air the exclusive tell-all interview.

07/11/2016 7:22 AM AEDT | Updated 07/11/2016 8:10 AM AEDT
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Dan Peled/Fairfax Media
Gable Tostee has given an exclusive interview to the Nine Network.

Gable Tostee has used a TV interview to speak frankly about what he says happened to New Zealander Warriena Wright who fell to her death from his Gold Coast apartment in 2014.

Tostee was found not guilty of the murder or manslaughter of Wright in a high-profile trial in Brisbane last month and will open up about his version of events in an exclusive interview on 60 Minutes on Sunday.

Tostee was reportedly paid a six-figure sum for the TV interview.

In a teaser for the report, Tostee is played a confronting recording he made of the encounter with Wright at his apartment. Wright is said to scream "no" 33 times in the audio.

"This was a guest in my home, it wasn't supposed to be this," Tostee told 60 Minutes.

"I restrained her to stop her from attacking me.

"She was certainly trying to make a lot of noise. I didn't know what else to do. I was just um... I wanted it to stop."

In the interview Tostee is asked point blank if he can understand why some people might think he's a "cold, heartless, cruel bastard".

Tostee was acquitted of all charges at last month's trial in a case that captivated the nation and made headlines around the world.

The key piece of evidence at the trial was the secret 199-minute recording Tostee made on his mobile phone that captured the pair's date and the lead up to Wright's death.

The prosecution's case was that Wright was so scared that she felt compelled to escape the apartment, then fell to her death while trying to climb to another balcony.

But Tostee's defence team successfully argued that he had used reasonable force to subdue an "erratic" Wright and that their client was acting in self-defence by forcing her outside.

The jury deliberated for four days before returning a verdict of not guilty.

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