LIFE

How To Be A Force For Good When The Whole World Feels Broken

It’s been a hard year.

02/12/2016 4:00 PM AEDT | Updated 02/12/2016 4:04 PM AEDT
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Andrew Bret Wallis
Show up, the world needs you right now.

Between the U.S. election, the Colombian plane crash and not to mention the conflict happening in Syria right now -- where 200, 000 residents are trapped, without hospital access and food -- hope can feel like a void, inconceivable concept.

Dealing with horrors beyond our control isn't something you learn at school. Really, it's not something your parents teach you either. But sometimes, bad stuff happens. And as you get older, that bad stuff becomes a little more familiar.

So, how do you deal? You find your people, open your mind and act. Ahead, all the ways you can do something that will help in its own small way to heal the world and in the process, hopefully, help to heal you.

Support the reef

Scientists around the globe agree that if we want our future generations to experience the Great Barrier Reef as we did as kids, Australia needs to start leading, not lagging behind in the global effort. Help the reef today by stopping the use of single-use plastic bags, which never actually break down fully, having huge impacts on the ecosystem. Also, ditch skincare products with microbeads, which also contaminate our waterways.

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Take action, donate and help.

Donate to Aleppo

As the colder months approach in war-torn Syria, UNHCR will continue their work in providing shelter, warm clothes and other necessities to the thousands of families who are displaced. Right now, a monetary donation (that is tax deductible) will go a long way. You can donate here.

Support your local Indigenous community

Did you watch First Contact? If not, you've probably heard about how moving it was. It revealed that for many Aboriginal families, a good job, healthcare and safe home is still just a dream. Engaging with Indigenous Australians, and celebrating Australia's first nation culture is the first step to closing the gap. Many communities celebrate Reconciliation Week or Survival Day (January 26th) with ceremonies, barbecues or concerts. Get involved.

Start a conversation

What does peace mean to you? It's an interesting, but important, question that world-renowned photographer Stuart Robertson has been asking as part of his "Peace in 10,000 Hands" global art project. He's photographed a single white rose (the ancient symbol of peace) in the hands of 10,000 people from every country in the world and the exhibition will be coming to the Leica Sydney store at QVB from December

Stuart Robertson
"Peace in 10,000 Hands" is global art project that hopes to spark a conversation about peace.

Make a rescue animal's day

This Christmas, instead of spending money on gifts that will soon be forgotten, buy your loved one a unique experience, like two hours' with a rescue dog or cat with all proceeds going to the animal shelter. Chuffed is a platform that operates like Red Balloon though for socially good experiences. Also, you can improve the life of an impounded dog for free, by taking one for a run via Rescue Your Fitness.

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