GREEN

The Countless Times David Attenborough And Nature Have Wowed Us

A match made in heaven.

09/12/2016 4:57 PM AEDT | Updated 11/12/2016 7:19 PM AEDT
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A courting pair of gannets on the Bass Rock

Over the years, Sir David Attenborough has become synonymous with jaw dropping moments of nature being nature. And he has influenced how we view the natural world.

With more than 100 series behind him spanning over 7 decades, Attenborough has come face-to-face with some stunning scenes that have translated into unforgettable moments onscreen. (And don't get us started on those smooth-talking, dulcet tones that can turn even the weirdest viral video into something special).

Next year, the man himself is making his way down under with his live show, 'A Quest For Life'.

In the mean time, bask in a select few of his greatest moments -- from making friends with an orangutan to scouring the majestic Great Barrier Reef that once was.

Planet Earth II: The Snake Chase

Australians are currently being littered with tantalising teasers of the upcoming documentary, Planet Earth II, set to hit our screens in 2017.

Like this one -- an animal chase of epic proportions. Watch as a team of racer snakes fling themselves off rocks in pursuit of a lone iguana.

It is quite possibly the most gripping chase. Ever.

Planet Earth II comes one decade after the original documentary, Planet Earth. Attenborough, now 90, takes viewers on a whimsical journey, uncovering the red crabs of Christmas Island and the pygmy three-toed sloths off the coast of Panama.

No surprises here, but it is shaping up to be totally epic:

Sir David Makes Friends With An Orangutan

Let's wind back the clock a few decades. In 1956, a youthful Attenborough journeyed to Indonesia in search of the fearsome Komodo dragon. Taking specimens back to London Zoo, he befriends a rather cheeky orangutan named Charlie. Adorable stuff.

The Great Barrier Reef: What It Once Was

Attenborough labels it one of nature's most impressive creations. Now, it is on the brink of extinction.

First arriving on the reef in 1957, he filmed a scuba dive with a wind-and-crank camera. It was a trip that catapulted what has become a lifetime wonder with the reef -- and one that led to his 2016 series, 'David Attenborough's Great Barrier Reef'.

Taking a look in time, and Attenborough has captured the diverse stretches of the reef -- before it was plagued by coral bleaching.

In its natural state, it is beautiful and, sadly, unrecognisable.

Boo!

This one needs no introduction. Put Sir David and an adorable (albeit slightly creepy) sloth in the same sentence and you have a match made in heaven.

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