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Former Playboy Model Accuses Oliver Stone Of Groping Her Breast

15/10/2017 8:41 AM AEDT | Updated 15/10/2017 8:53 AM AEDT
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Director Oliver Stone is accused of molesting Carrie Stevens at a dinner party a couple of decades ago.

A former Playboy centrefold model accused director Oliver Stone, who had defended Harvey Weinstein on Thursday, of molesting her when she was 22.

Actress and model Carrie Stevens, now 48, told HuffPost late Thursday that Stone "groped" her breast without her permission at a dinner party.

Stevens, who was Playboy's Miss June 1997, described the encounter on her private social media pages Thursday night after seeing an interview with Stone published earlier in the day by The Hollywood Reporter. In it, Stone appeared to sympathise with Weinstein, who's been accused of sexually harassing or assaulting dozens of women, by saying, "It's not easy what he's going through."

Stone has since clarified his statement, saying now he is "appalled" by the accusations against the fired co-founder of The Weinstein Co. and was withdrawing from a television project involving the company, according to Variety.

"When I heard about Harvey, the first person I thought of was Oliver Stone, and it figures," Stevens wrote in a private Facebook post seen by HuffPost. It includeed a link to The Hollywood Reporter's interview with Stone.

Stevens told HuffPost the encounter with Stone took place in the 1990s.

"Oliver saw me where I was standing near the door and he just reached out and groped me, grabbed my boob like it was a toy or a hand you'd shake," Stevens said. Then, she added, he "grinned a shit-eating grin and kept walking."

Stone's agent did not respond to HuffPost's request for comment by the time of publication.

Stone has since spoken out against Weinstein, backtracking from his comments Thursday in The Hollywood Reporter in which he defended Weinstein.

In that interview, Stone said:

I'm a believer that you wait until this thing gets to trial ....

I believe a man shouldn't be condemned by a vigilante system. It's not easy what he's going through, either. During that period he was a rival. I never did business with him and didn't really know him. I've heard horror stories on everyone in the business, so I'm not going to comment on gossip. I'll wait and see, which is the right thing to do.

But Friday, Stone walked back that remark, telling Variety that he had been traveling and was unaware that even more women have accused Weinstein of harassment and assault since last week.

"After looking at what has been reported in many publications over the last couple of days, I'm appalled and commend the courage of the women who've stepped forward to report sexual abuse or rape," he said.

"I'll therefore recuse myself from the 'Guantanamo' series as long as The Weinstein Company is involved."

On Thursday, Stevens aired her feelings about Stone on her private Facebook page and Twitter.

"I still remember the cocky grin on his face like he got away with something," Stevens wrote on Facebook, referring to Stone. "These douche bags are not above the law, and they should be held to the same standard as every other man."

When asked about her post, Stevens told HuffPost: "A polite handshake would have sufficed. He didn't have to grab my boob."

During his decades-long career, Stone has won three Academy Awards and five Golden Globe awards. Recent notable films include "Snowden" and "Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps."

Stevens isn't the only one accusing Stone of inappropriate behavior. In a series of tweets, actress Patricia Arquette described a "weird" experience she once had with the director.

Stone had invited Arquette to a screening of "Natural Born Killers," after he had already sent her long-stemmed roses, she said. "Something felt weird," Arquette tweeted, so she brought her boyfriend with her to the screening.

At the event, she said Stone stopped her from exiting the bathroom and asked why she brought her boyfriend. She told Stone: "Why is it a problem I brought him? It shouldn't be a problem. Think about THAT Oliver" ― then never heard from him about the movie again.

In Stevens' encounter, she says Stone was acting like an "entitled pig." And if others had noticed, she said, they didn't say anything.

"He was too powerful, but it affected me," Stevens said.

"His actions sent the message of how small and trivial I was and that the only reason someone powerful would be interested in me is for my body parts and not my brains, and certainly not my talent."

Stevens said she was moved to share her story after The New York Times and The New Yorker published investigative reports that included accounts of women accusing Weinstein of raping, sexually assaulting and harassing them over a period of decades. Weinstein's accusers include Ashley Judd, Rose McGowan, Asia Argento, Angelina Jolie, Gwyneth Paltrow, Rosanna Arquette, Heather Graham and Cara Delevingne.

Drew Angerer via Getty Images
Harvey Weinstein has been fired from The Weinstein Co. since the barrage of accusations against him began. Dozens of women have accused him of harassment, assault and rape.

Stevens wrote on Facebook Tuesday that she has had "issues in this business more times than I can count. I never took a stand because sadly, I thought I didn't matter."

She later told HuffPost it was important to see celebrities stand up against a powerful executive.

"I really loved acting. I still do it, but I don't get to read for big movies like the stars Harvey victimized," Stevens said.

"It was empowering to know that they went through it, too. I thought somehow they were better than me, and that's why I got groped, but so did they."

Stevens said she has a goddaughter who wants to be an actress, but wants the industry's attitude toward women to change so she can pursue a career without being harassed or assaulted.

"That is what we aim for," Stevens said. "I think there is strength in numbers. The more people who stand up, the better."

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