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Aging Punk Rockers Have A Message To The Kids: 'F**k Youth!'

Smells like senior citizen spirit.
Superbean, a Los Angeles punk band, performs it's new song, 'F**k Youth.'
Superbean, a Los Angeles punk band, performs it's new song, 'F**k Youth.'

Punk rock has been around for more than four decades, which means the original creators are old enough for social security (or at least AARP cards).

Yet the genre still maintains its youthful appeal as anyone who has been snarled at by a teen wearing a Ramones T-shirt can attest.

That’s why old school punks can relate to a new song by a bunch of cranky old musicians called, appropriately enough, “Fuck Youth.”

The Los Angeles-based punk group Superbean performs the song that doesn’t mince words:

“Kids today think they’re so great

They think they really got it made

GOT IT MADE!

When I was their age it was so much cooler

When I got older I found out the truth

FUCK YOUTH!”

And, yes, the video for the song features an old guy yelling, “You kids get off my lawn!”

Steve Moramarco, the group’s 51-year-old guitarist, insists he’s “not anti-youth,” but “Fuck Youth” is the type of song every generation sings.

“In the old days punk rock was about the kids, the ‘wild youth’ in the streets,” he told HuffPost. “Today all the punks are old and it’s the kids that are the problem.”

The song seems to be striking a chord with people who’ve been moshing since back in the day.

The video was posted on Facebook earlier this week and already has more than 110,000 views, and Moramarco said he’s receiving positive remarks from as far away as Brazil and Switzerland.

Despite the song’s angry old man point of view, Moramarco does sympathize with the surly teens he sees snarling at him in their safety-pinned Sex Pistols shirts.

“I see kids today wearing the same t-shirts of punk bands I wore when I was growing up,” he said. “They know their bands suck and ours rule.”

In true punk fashion, Moramarco doesn’t know what the future holds for the band or the song, but admits that the objectives of being an aging punk are different than when he was 21.

“Being punk at 51 is staying out of the pit and drinking La Croix,” he said.

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