12 Baby Names Beautifully Inspired By The Four Seasons

From Amber and Ash, to Skye and Dawn – these unique monikers represent autumn, winter, spring and summer.

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At the autumn equinox, the weather changed almost overnight: from heady, hot summer sun to cool rain and the glow of copper leaves on the ground.

If you want to channel the time when the earth settles into a new season, what better way than to give your little one a name inspired by this special shift in time?

We have a wealth of baby name inspiration on HuffPost UK Parents, but here are 12 monikers that beautifully represent the changing of the seasons.

Photo Taken In Finland, Oulu
Photo Taken In Finland, Oulu

Autumn

Amber

In Arabic, the meaning of Amber is ‘jewel’. You may know it by the honey-coloured stone that’s actually made of fossilised tree resin.

Ash

In Hebrew, the meaning of the name ‘Ash’ is happy. It’s also a beautiful tree.

Autumn

Call a spade a spade! One of the most perfect names for a baby born in autumn is... Autumn, from the Latin word ‘autumnus’.

Summer

Kyra

Krya comes from the Egyptian word for ‘sun’.

Skye

This pretty name means sky and is taken from the old Norse ‘sky’, meaning ‘cloud’.

Summer

Once again, the straightforward English name Summer – associated with the warmest season of the year – wins our vote!

Spring

Blossom

Of English origin, this name means ‘flower’ or ‘bloom’.

Dawn

Old English in origin, Dawn takes its meaning from the first appearance of light, or daybreak.

Hazel

Hazel comes from the name of the tree, or the colour, and was originally spelled hæsel in Old English.

Winter

Holly

This comes from the Old English, meaning, ‘dwelling by the clearing by the hollow’. But of course, it conjures up thoughts of the perfect Christmas plant.

Jack

Jack, meaning ‘God is gracious’, is forever tied to Jack Frost – a figure representing ice, snow, sleet, winter, and freezing cold in books, stories and film.

Niamh

This Irish girl’s name, meaning ‘snow’, can also be spelled with its English form of Neve.